Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia

Family, domestic and sexual violence is a major health and welfare issue in Australia and globally. It occurs across all ages, socioeconomic and demographic groups but mainly affects women and children. Indigenous women, young women and pregnant women are particularly at risk.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report released on 28 February 2018 combines data from more than 20 sources to provide a comprehensive picture of what is known about family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia.

Some interesting data from the report is set out below. A full copy of the report is available here: Family, Domestic and Sexual Violence in Australia

Violence takes various forms

Family, domestic and sexual violence. Statistics in Australia

* Source: Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia 2018, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Often people do not seek advice or support

A large proportion of women and men do not seek help or support for partner violence.

For women

According to the  2016 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Personal Safety Survey (2016 PSS), almost half of the women (46%) who experienced current partner violence and more than one-third (37%) who experienced previous partner violence did not seek advice or support after the incident.

The most common reasons women gave for not seeking advice or support were that they either:

  • felt they could deal with the issue themselves (50% for current partner violence; 47% for previous partner violence);
  • thought the incident was not serious enough (36% for current partner violence; 18,  for previous partner violence); or
  • felt shame or embarrassment (11% for current partner violence; 25% for previous partner violence).

For men

According to the 2016 PSS, more than two-thirds of men (68%) who experienced current partner violence, and 3 in 5 men (59%) who experienced previous partner violence did not seek advice or support after the incident.

The most common reasons men gave for not seeking advice or support were that they either:

  • thought it was not serious enough to seek help (49% for current partner violence; 22% for previous partner violence);
  • felt that they could deal with it themselves (37% for current partner violence; 60% for previous partner violence); or
  • did not want or need help (31% for current partner violence; 31% for current previous partner violence).

Police and legal system

Police intervention is a key entry point to formal family, domestic and sexual violence services for victims and perpetrators.

In some cases, a court order (known as a restraining order) can be obtained to prohibit an individual from carrying out a particular action, especially approaching or contacting a specified person.

Based on the 2016 PSS, of those who experienced previous partner violence:

  • 1 in 4 (24%) women had a restraining order issued against their previous partner; and
  • 1 in 10 (10%) men had a restraining order issued against their previous partner.

How can CS Legal help me?

Our team of Perth and Joondalup lawyers can assist you with understanding how to best deal with a restraining order.

We will seek the best outcome for you to ensure the matter is dealt with quickly and effectively, giving you peace of mind for your future.

If necessary we can work with you to negotiate settling the matter with the other party and can also attend a Final Order Hearing.

Useful Articles

Understanding WA’s new Family Violence Restraining Order

On 1 July 2017, a new type of restraining order was introduced in Western Australia, namely a ‘Family Violence Restraining...

Who pays the school fees? Child support and private school fees explained

As a general rule, a parent cannot be required to pay additional child support for private school fees. After all,...

Do I Need A Parenting Plan?

Separating from your partner can be a difficult and stressful time, particularly if children are involved. It is important for...